What's Hot on Gile Travel

Bizarre Foods

Moonshine and Sweet Tea 03:48

Expedition Unknown

Cloning the Woolly Mammoth 42:01

Gile Travel On the Go

Stream Your Favorite Shows

Trending Destinations

Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah

Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah

UT 12 winds through Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, which protects 1.88-million acres of landscape containing unique Native American and geological sites, including petroglyphs, fossils and natural arches. With its quiet backroads, spectacular national parks and monuments, the large area called the Grand Circle that encompasses southern Utah and northern Arizona makes for one of the most memorable road trips in the United States. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

The Wave, Utah/Arizona border

The Wave, Utah/Arizona border

The Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness on the Utah/Arizona border near Kanab, Utah, requires a permit from the Bureau of Land Management and a difficult hike to reach. The payoff is remote, otherworldly scenery and the surreal swoop of sandstone called The Wave, formed by wind erosion. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Zion National Park, Utah

Zion National Park, Utah

Zion National Park, Utah's first national park, was created in 1909 and is renowned for its red cliffs, hidden gardens, waterfalls and emerald pools. It is a favorite destination for hikers worldwide. 960 1280

AndrewSoundarajan  

Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

Bryce Canyon National Park was established in 1928 and protects a colorful landscape of sandstone spires called hoodoos that were formed through eons of freeze-thaw erosion. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Capitol Reef National Park, Utah

Capitol Reef National Park, Utah

Capitol Reef National Park protects 378-square-miles of colorful landscape and historic human inhabitation, including ruins left by ancient Native Americans and Mormon settlers in the 1880s. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Fremont Petroglyphs, Utah

Fremont Petroglyphs, Utah

Located in Captial Reef National Park, these petroglyphs were left by the Fremont Culture some 2,000 years ago. Utah's striking landscapes and public lands contribute to Utah's $7.4 billion tourism industry. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Arches National Park, Moab, Utah

Arches National Park, Moab, Utah

Arches National Park near Moab, Utah, protects more than 2,000 natural stone arches, including Double Arch, pictured here. 960 1280

  

Natural Bridges National Monument, Utah

Natural Bridges National Monument, Utah

Natural Bridges National Monument protects natural arches (including the pictured Sipapu Bridge), Native American ruins and a lush riparian watershed. President Theodore Roosevelt declared the site a national monument in 1908. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Gooseneck State Park

Gooseneck State Park

Gooseneck State Park near Mexican Hat, Utah, is a popular photo and camping stop with eight first-come-first-serve sites. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Canyonlands National Park, Utah

Canyonlands National Park, Utah

One of Utah's "Might 5" national parks, Canyonlands National Park is a playground for outdoor adventurers. Mountain bikers, four-wheelers, hikers and backpackers explore these 337,598 acres of unique geology and Native American ruins. 960 1280

Jeremy Pawlowski  

Bears Ears National Monument, Utah

Bears Ears National Monument, Utah

Bears Ears National Monument in Utah, established by President Obama in 2016, protects hundreds of Native American archaeological sites. The area is still an important source of traditional resources and spiritual significance to several Native American tribes, including the Navajo Nation. Bears Ears National Monument encompasses Valley of the Gods. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Bluff, Utah

Bluff, Utah

Bluff, Utah, is a gateway to many of Utah's popular destinations including Bears Ears National Monument, and is home to the Twin Rocks Cafe, name for the towering rock formation behind it. Many areas in Utah are revered for their dark night skies, which are among darkest in North America. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Cow Canyon Trading Post, Bluff, Utah

Cow Canyon Trading Post, Bluff, Utah

This weathered 1949 Buick Super parked in front of Cow Canyon Trading Post in Bluff has become a must-stop photo attraction for road trippers. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

US 163 on the Utah/Arizona border

US 163 on the Utah/Arizona border

Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park as seen driving south on US 163 from Utah into Arizona. The entrance to the park is on the Utah and Arizona border. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, Utah/Arizona

Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, Utah/Arizona

Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park is called Tse'Bii'Ndzisgaii in the Diné language and means "Valley of the Rocks." This iconic 91,696-acre park has been featured in many movies and has come to symbolize the American West. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Antelope Canyon, Arizona

Antelope Canyon, Arizona

Antelope Canyon east of Page, Arizona, is a surreal labyrinth of slot canyons on Navajo tribal land. A Navajo guide is required to visit the site, and several tour operators are located in Page. It got its English name from the herd of pronghorn antelope that used to live in the area. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Horseshoe Bend, Arizona

Horseshoe Bend, Arizona

The Colorado River flows through Horseshoe Bend four miles south of Page, Arizona, accessed via a 3/4-mile-long trail on the west side of US 89. It is 1,000 feet from the canyon rim to the water. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Hopi Pueblo, Arizona

Hopi Pueblo, Arizona

Hopi dancer Kyle Chase of the Pollen Trail Dancers displays his talent throughout the Southwest, including at Grand Canyon National Park. Hopi Pueblo consists of three ancient villages east of the Grand Canyon in Arizona. The Hopi Cultural Center off of AZ 264 in Second Mesa details the history and culture of the tribe, and the tribally owned Moenkopi Legacy Inn & Suites near Tuba City makes a good road trip rest stop. 960 1280

  

Cameron Trading Post, Arizona

Cameron Trading Post, Arizona

A Navajo master weaver demonstrate her skill in the Cameron Trading Post weaving room. Cameron Trading Post, located 30 minutes from the Grand Canyon's East Entrance on AZ 64, is a trading post, restaurant and hotel that was built in 1916. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

Grand Canyon National Park is 277 miles long and 18 miles across at its widest point between the north and south rims, and one mile at its deepest. It was established in 1919 by President Theodore Roosevelt, who said of it: "The Grand Canyon fills me with awe. It is beyond comparison–beyond description; absolutely unparalleled throughout the wide world...Let this great wonder of nature remain as it now is. Do nothing to mar its grandeur, sublimity and loveliness. You cannot improve on it. But what you can do is to keep it for your children, your children's children, and all who come after you, as the one great sight which every American should see." 960 1280

Steve Larese   

The Maldives

The Maldives

Before you plan to have kids, consider taking one (or more!) of these bucket list trips. Some are too physically challenging to undertake with children, others too expensive, too far away or simply more fun without worrying about attending to children’s interests.

And in the case of the Maldives, pictured here, if you wait until your hypothetical offspring are all grown, you may just miss your chance. The nation of 26 atolls in the Indian Ocean is drowning under rising sea levels.
960 1280

DOELAN Yann  

Milford Track, New Zealand

Milford Track, New Zealand

This 53-kilometer walk traverses lakes, fjords, and peaks via rope bridges, boardwalks and alpine passes. The breathtaking scenery includes skyscraping mountains, deep river valleys and New Zealand’s tallest waterfall. Add on a side trip to Sydney or the Great Barrier Reef while you’re there – you probably won’t be eager to take the 24-hour flight from the U.S. again after you’ve had kids. 960 1280

DEA / C. DANI I. JESKE  

Disney World

Disney World

At the opposite end of the travel spectrum are family-friendly destinations that are actually way better without kids. Orlando, Florida’s Walt Disney World is one of those trips. Enjoy the park without strollers and backpacks, hit all the rides (even those with height requirements), and sample cocktails from around the world at Epcot. 960 1280

Kevin Fleming  

Italy's Amalfi Coast

Italy's Amalfi Coast

A beautiful, pricey destination with not much for kids to do except take in the scenery, the 50 miles of steep cliffs rising out of southern Italy’s Mediterranean coastline offers cultural sophistication and romantic, picturesque scenery. 960 1280

Lina Harb / EyeEm  

Machu Picchu

Machu Picchu

Erosion caused by extreme weather conditions combined with damage from tourism also threatens Machu Picchu. Located 8,000 feet above sea level in a remote area of Peru’s Andes Mountains, the “Lost City of the Incas” is considered one of the greatest ancient ruins in the world. Difficult to get to, expensive, and endangered, Machu Picchu is more appropriate for an adults-only trip than for one with kids in tow. 960 1280

Spaces Images/Blend Images  

New Orleans

New Orleans

Another area under threat from climate change, New Orleans, with its historic districts, unique culture, and lively nightlife, is the city where you can indulge your inner adult. So make music and make merry in the Big Easy – sans kids. 960 1280

Bruce Yuanyue Bi  

Road Trip Across America

Road Trip Across America

A cross-country road trip is the dream of many young Americans (and non-Americans, too). Now’s the time to head out on Route 66 with your spirit of adventure – before any backseat whines of “Are we there yet?” can spoil your drive. 960 1280

Ted Soqui  

Israel

Israel

For a combination of history, culture and natural beauty, is there any trip more enticing than Israel? Given the longstanding unrest in the region, many parents prefer not to take kids. Plus, many locales in Israel, like Safed in the northern mountains, with its thriving artists’ community and deep spiritual traditions are best suited to your undivided adult attention. 960 1280

Evan Lang  

Cambodia

Cambodia

Like Israel, Cambodia has a rich spiritual tradition and deeply painful recent history. The many reminders of this history – from land mines to the Killing Fields are probably too disturbing for children, but intrepid adults who make their way across the Southeast Asian country from Phnom Penh to Angkor Wat via bus, boat or on the back of a local’s moped, will be rewarded with gorgeous scenery, ancient temples and friendly people. 960 1280

John S Lander  

Antarctic Expedition

Antarctic Expedition

Looking for a trip that’s even pricier, further away and less kid-friendly? Why not travel to the literal end of the earth? A number of cruise ships offer excursions, often via Zodiac, to the Antarctic Peninsula, where you can hike a glacier, take a polar plunge, kayak icy waters and observe native wildlife like penguins! 960 1280

Paul Souders  

Morocco Beyond Marrakech

Morocco Beyond Marrakech

Visiting Morocco will change your view of the world, however many travelers consider the North African country too challenging, physically and logistically to manage with kids. Hire a guide and be sure to tour the sites outside of Marrakech. Berber villages and Fez, a city that still has a 12th-century feel, are must-sees. 960 1280

ugurhan  

Sanganeb Marine National Park and Dungonab Bay/Mukkawar Island Marine National Park, Sudan

Sanganeb Marine National Park and Dungonab Bay/Mukkawar Island Marine National Park, Sudan

This inclusion encompasses Sanganeb Marine National Park and Dungonab Bay/Mukkawar Island Marine National Park. Both are found off the coast of Sudan in the Red Sea, and represent every scuba diver’s dream. The parks are renowned for their coral reefs, plus they’re packed with marine life, from dolphins and turtles to sharks and tropical fish. This protected area is also home to a large dugong population, a manatee relation that’s distinguished by its fluked whale-like tail. 960 1280

Franco Banfi  

Gorham's Cave Complex, Gibraltar, United Kingdom

Gorham's Cave Complex, Gibraltar, United Kingdom

You’ve likely heard of the Rock of Gibraltar, known since ancient Greek times as part of the 12 impossible tasks Hercules had to perform. It’s located on the Gibraltar peninsula in Spain near Morocco, which has been a British territory since the early 18th century. Even more fascinating is that the limestone caves on the rock’s eastern side were once home to Neanderthals for at least 100,000 years. Four caves comprise Gorham’s Cave Complex, where archeologists have uncovered rock carvings, ornamental feathers and proof of a plant- and meat-based diet. The caves are also significant because they’re considered one of the last known Neanderthal dwellings, whose inhabitants lived there as recently as 28,000 years ago. 960 1280

Gannet77  

Hubei Shennongjia, China

Hubei Shennongjia, China

Shennongjia Nature Reserve, a subtropical Chinese forest in the Hubei province, is home to one of China’s most biodiverse regions. Here you can find rare animal species, including the Asian black bear, clouded leopard and golden snub-nosed monkey. It’s not easy getting to the reserve, and much of it is inaccessible, but there are tourist-friendly areas worth making the multi-hour trek. You’ll find hiking trails (keep an eye out for the Chinese equivalent of Big Foot) and the impressive Shennong Altar. If you’re up for it, climb the long flight of stairs for a close-up view of the giant half-human, half-bull statue. As an active shrine, don’t be surprised to see locals paying their respects here.   960 1280

Thomas Marent/ Minden Pictures  

Archaeological Site of Ani, Turkey

Archaeological Site of Ani, Turkey

Ancient ruins are often associated with Italy or Greece; in fact, the Archaeological Site of Philippi in Greece made this UNESCO list as well. But the ruins in Ani, Turkey, literally a stone’s throw from Armenia, are fascinating because its history as a major medieval center isn’t widely known. The city existed from the 10th to 17th centuries; at least 100,000 lived here during its height in the 11th century, when it was known as “The City of 1,001 Churches.” As an in-demand locale, it was conquered endless times throughout the centuries by everyone from the Ottomans (more than once) and Mongols to the Byzantines and Armenians. (Relations with the latter have long been tense, and the border has remained closed since 1993.) In fact, events in modern history have made it impossible for anyone to visit Ani until this past decade. Those who make the trek will find some of the ruins remarkably intact, considering centuries of war, earthquakes and vandalism. Between few tourists and the rugged, unpopulated landscape, it’s easy to visualize what life might have been like so long ago. 960 1280

Izzet Keribar  

Pampulha Modern Ensemble, Brazil

Pampulha Modern Ensemble, Brazil

This former complex, consisting of a church, casino, ballroom, golf course and yacht club, were all part of a grander scheme for a planned community in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Centered around man-made Pampulha Lake, the complex is a stunning example of modern architecture in the early 1940s. It was also one of architect Oscar Niemeyer’s first major projects; he went on to play a significant role in Brazil’s modern architecture movement. (It’s worth noting that famed modern architect Le Corbusier greatly influenced Niemeyer’s work; he also made this UNESCO list.) Though Pampulha no longer functions as a community, you can visit the site, along with the Pampulha Art Museum, located in the former casino. 960 1280

Fandrade  

Ennedi Massif, Chad

Ennedi Massif, Chad

UNESCO added the Ennedi Massif section of the Ennedi Plateau, part of the Sahara Desert in Chad, for two reasons. The first is the wind-ravaged landscape, where towering canyons and plunging valleys are dotted by otherworldly sandstone formations. The second is the area’s abundance of petroglyphs, or rock art, deemed to be one of the largest examples in the Sahara. Much of the artwork dates back thousands of years. Niola Doa (dancing maidens) is one of the oldest and most famous sites. The hardy few that venture this far will encounter life-size depictions of women covered in intricate designs and jewelry; the complexity of it makes the mind reel to think it’s about 7,000 years old. 960 1280

Nigel Pavitt  

Stećci Medieval Tombstone Graveyards, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia and Montenegro

Stećci Medieval Tombstone Graveyards, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia and Montenegro

Stećci, or medieval tombstones, are largely found throughout Bosnia and Herzegovina, and to a lesser extent in the bordering areas of Croatia, Serbia and Montenegro. UNESCO chose 28 sites for their elaborate engravings and other regional distinctions. Most of the cemeteries date between the 12th and 16th centuries, and a surprising number of limestone tombstones are well preserved, showing off inscriptions and designs that favored animals, flowers, crosses and more. Radimlja in Herzegovina contains some of the best examples of stećci thanks to a large number in a variety of shapes and sizes. Some of the most impressive tombs contain carvings of knights with bows and arrows — exactly what you’d hope to find from the Middle Ages. 960 1280

istankov  

Mistaken Point, Canada

Mistaken Point, Canada

Mistaken Point supposedly earned its name after countless sailors mistakenly navigated there. However, UNESCO added this rugged Newfoundland coastal area for its ancient fossils. And by ancient, this part of Canada has quietly concealed one of the oldest examples on record of large, complex life forms, which have been traced back 580 million years. The remains of these deep ocean dwellers were buried and preserved by volcanic ash; fossils found before this era reflect microscopic creatures. The Edge of Avalon Interpretive Centre, part of the Mistaken Point Ecological Reserve, leads seasonal hikes to Mistaken Point since visitors aren’t allowed without an official guide. 960 1280

Barrett & MacKay  

Archaeological Site of Nalanda Mahavihara (Nalanda University), Bihar, India

Archaeological Site of Nalanda Mahavihara (Nalanda University), Bihar, India

Nalanda University holds the distinction of one of the oldest universities in the world. Founded as early as the 3rd century B.C., it lasted until around the 13th century, when invaders destroyed it. It functioned as a Buddhist center and a place of higher education, where, in addition to Buddhist teachings, students are said to have learned everything from medicine and philosophy to astronomy and math. At its peak as many 10,000 students attended, and came as far away as Turkey and Korea (which explains evidence of dorms). The campus contained classrooms, temples, a library and meditation halls. Tourists can visit the ancient ruins, as well as the Nalanda Archaeological Museum, where objects excavated from the site are on display. 960 1280

De Agostini / G. Nimatallah  

The Persian Qanat, Iran

The Persian Qanat, Iran

Qanat are irrigation tunnels that have carried much-needed water to Iran’s desert regions for more than 3,000 years. It’s estimated that more than 30,000 qanat are still in use today; UNESCO chose 11 as ideal representations of the ancient system, such as containing a rest area for laborers to watermills and reservoirs. 960 1280

Richard I'Anson